Move Over Fast Food Touch Screens…There’s A New Automation In Town

Between the battle for jobs a lot of the competition can get lost in the shuffle.  From demands from liberal do-nothings for higher minimum “living wages” to the importation of migrant workers to take jobs for lower wages, there’s a lot to bicker over.

Thankfully, our robot overlords are here to save us by making all of those people obsolete. This is sort of a joke, or at least it should be but it isn’t.  In fact, it’s so serious that over 50 Walmart stores are getting robot stockers to help place items on the shelves that a liberal will demand $20 an hour to do.  The best part for the management, of course, is that the robots don’t form unions, demand higher wages, or go on strike for absurdities.

They also never need to eat, their only maintanence is repairs, and unless they’re being recharged they really don’t ever stop working.  Sure, they’re about as mindless as a living, breathing liberal but they don’t have any obsession with Hollywood or Bernie Sanders either.  They won’t make for great conversation but neither will the average millennial.

 

Here’s what Walmart has to say on the matter:

“If you are running up and down the aisle and you want to decide if we are out of Cheerios or not, a human doesn’t do that job very well, and they don’t like it,” chief technology officer for Walmart U.S. and e-commerce, Jeremy King told Reuters.

The robots will be used in an expanded test next month in stores in Arkansas, Pennsylvania and California, according to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

The robots are more productive and can scan shelves more accurately and faster than human employees, company officials told Reuters.

Now, any science-fiction readers here need not fret–these robots may be good at accomplishing a few tasks at Walmart, but they lack the tools necessary to overthrow the human race: opposable thumbs.  They actually lack arms in general.

But seriously, techno-phobes, as much as automation is a real threat to the job market, these robots really do sound handy–they completely remove the tedium from retail:

A robot will be kept at a recharging station in a selected store and will move into action when it receives a “mission” like scanning aisles to locate inaccurately priced items. The information collected will be relayed to employees, who then will determine how to prioritize and correct any problems that it finds. Hitch said the information will give department managers and other employees “visibility across the entire department before they start the day.”

“It’s still really all about the A to Z process of capturing data, analyzing data, creating actions and then taking actions,” Hitch said. “Within that, we’re good at doing a part of it, and we’re terrible at doing a part of it. When it comes to picking the product up, the robot has no arms. That’s a really difficult science, and it’s a slow, slow science. We know that the store associates will always be better at that.”

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